MEMBERS OF YOUTH PARLIAMENT

The Role of the Members of Youth Parliament

During their term of office, Members of Youth Parliament (MYPs) work with their MPs, decision-makers, councillors and local youth groups on the issues of greatest concern to their constituents.

Nationally, the views of young people are represented in the UK Youth Parliament manifesto, which contains statements on the issues Members of Youth Parliament think are most important.

Members of Youth Parliament across the UK work to give young people a voice – listening to marginalised groups, organising events, making films, meeting MPs, lobbying for change, organising campaigns and appearing in the media, all to amplify the views of their peers.

The role of a Member of Youth Parliament is increasingly being recognised at a local and national level. Some local authorities have given their MYPs equal status to their MPs, and the UK Youth Parliament works hard to enable Members of Youth Parliament to meet regularly with Government Ministers, Members of the Opposition and civil servants.

The UK Youth Parliament also works to promote the role and influence of Members of Youth Parliament to service providers, e.g. the transport industry and health services.

 

STEERING GROUP

The UK Youth Parliament’s steering group make the decisions that guide the development of the organisation, and agree on the arrangements for each sitting.

The steering group is made up of one Member of Youth Parliament from each region and the three devolved nations of the UK, who have been nominated by their region/nation to represent the views of their Members of Youth Parliament at a national level. It aims to meet a minimum of five times a year.

The steering group was formerly known as the procedures group. 

To contact the steering group, email: ukyppg@byc.org.uk

East Midlands – Lauren Duguid

East of England – Cameron Hodds

London – Theo Sergiou

North East – Tessy Idemudia

North West – Imogen Walsh

Northern Ireland – Anna McElhinney

Scotland –  TBC

South East – Libby Russell

South West- Niamh Mills

West Midlands – Alfie Green

Yorkshire and Humber – Alannah White

East Midlands – Simran Sangherra

East of England – Harvey Luker

London – Samira-Caterina Monteleone

North East – Esther Kirk 

North West – Imogen Walsh

Northern Ireland – Cliodhna McCaffrey 

Scotland – Josh Kennedy

South East – Khadeejah Hullemuth 

South West- Caitlin O'Regan 

West Midlands – Alfie Green

Yorkshire and Humber – Brandon Green 

East Midlands – Nishat Tamanna

East of England – Matthew Tinker

London – Oscar Thorpe

North East – Rebecca Moore

North West – Caitlin Cavanagh

Northern Ireland – Darragh O’Reilly

Scotland – Jack Norquoy

South East – Joshua Gray

South West- Chloe Lintern

Wales and British Forces Overseas – Jâc Scott

West Midlands – Connor Hill

Yorkshire and Humber – Jack Hogan

East Midlands – Nishat Tamanna

East of England – Matthew Tinker

London – Oscar Thorpe

North East – Rebecca Moore

North West – Caitlin Cavanagh

Northern Ireland – Darragh O’Reilly

Scotland – Jack Norquoy

South East – Joshua Gray

South West- Chloe Lintern

Wales and British Forces Overseas – Jâc Scott

West Midlands – Connor Hill

Yorkshire and Humber – Jack Hogan

East Midlands – Rachel Wibberley

East of England – Emily Fox

London – Saffron Worrell

North East – Rebecca Moore

North West – Laura Edwards

Northern Ireland – Rebecca Connolly

South East – Kelly Balmer

South West- Chloe Lintern

West Midlands – Namir Chowdhury

Yorkshire and Humber – Minhaz Abedin

Scotland – Ewan McCall

East Midlands – Rachel Wibberley

East of England – Jakub  Makowski

London – Dunja Relić

North East – Jess Belch

North West – Ciara Brodie

Northern Ireland – Rebecca Connolly

South East – Thomas Soud

South West- Jessica Elms

West Midlands – Billy Howells

Yorkshire and Humber – Livy Newton

Scotland – Martyna Napierska

London – Fred Gill

Yorkshire and Humber – Katie Ward

East of England – Billie Bell

Northern Ireland – Ryan Cairns

South West – Jessica Elms

South East – Matthew Smeeth

West Midlands – Lukas Colledge

North East – Matthew Otubu

East Midlands – Ashleigh O’Mahoney

North West – Ciaran O’Shea

Scotland – Louise Cameron

London – Rhammel Afflick

Yorkshire and Humber – David McIntyre

East of England – Alex Hunt

Northern Ireland – Oliver Donelly

South West – Sam Foulder – Hughes

North West – Jessica Colston

West Midlands – Georgina Heeley

North East – Simon Pickles

East Midlands – Poppie Simmonds

South East – Jana Hunter

Scotland – Kyle Thornton

South West – Siobhan Brasier

North East – Reece Connelly

South East – Graham Findlay

Northern Ireland – Shona Morrison

East Midlands – Natalie Smith

North West – Samantha Parkes

London – Rhammel Afflick

West Midlands – Nadirur Choudhury

Yorkshire and Humber – Jayde Tunnacliffe

East of England – Joseph Reason

East Midlands – Chris Bennetts & Natalie Smith

East of England – Holly Abbott & Colette Lewis

London – Funmi Abari & David Collier

Northern Ireland – Conal O’Hare & Ellen Shannon

North East – Misba Islam & Katrina Sugden

North West – Asma Butt & Jamie Elkaleh

South East – Diko Blackings & Josh Harsant

South West – Siobhan Brasier & Kate Taylor

West Midlands – Manraj Mander & Oliver Philips

Yorkshire & Humberside – Sonia Sanghera & Jayde Tunnacliffe

DEBATE LEADS

Each Region and Nation will elect a Debate Lead and a reserve to represent their area at the UK Youth Parliament’s debate in the House of Commons each year. Giving us a total of 12 Debate Leads.

A further three debate leads will be chosen from the following regions/ nations:

  1. Army Welfare Service Overseas
  2. The region/nation with the highest percentage increase in turnout (this will be calculated based on the provisional results submitted by 9th October)
  3. Northern Ireland

The selection of regions with a 2nd Debate Lead has been made by the Steering Group, who have agreed a rota system. For more information on this, please read the Procedures Book.

What does the Debate Lead do?

Debate Leads shape each of the proposed campaigns by providing speeches For, Against and a Summation at the House of Commons Sitting (tbc)

Debate Leads must:

  • Be passionate about the work they are doing for the UK Youth Parliament.
  • Have examples of work they have done as a Member of Youth Parliament.
  • Want to develop public speaking skills.
  • Be prepared to represent the views of the young people of the UK on the 5 issues that receive the most votes, even if they do not agree with them.
  • Be prepared to advise the UK Youth Parliament on how the debate should be run and structured, following the information provided by the House of Commons Outreach Team.
  • Feedback their experiences and learning to their regions or nations.

STAFF

UK Youth Parliament is hosted and managed by the charity The British Youth Council. The British Youth Council is the National Youth Council of the UK. A youth-led charity, we empower young people aged 25 and under to influence and inform the decisions that affect their lives. We support young people to get involved in their communities and democracy locally, nationally and internationally, making a difference as volunteers, campaigners, decision-makers and leaders.

TOP